Disk Warrior 5 Saved A Year of Photos!

Last April, two days before I left to go back to the USA to be with my dying mother, I tried to reformat my main backup drive with my complete library of images on it. Honestly, I wasn’t trying to do this. A day before, I had another drive fail, and I thought I was reformatting that drive. But in my haste and with my mind already with my mother I selected the wrong drive. This drive had close to a year’s worth of photos that were a backup of the failed drive. But these photos were the only copy, they were the backup.

As soon as it started formatting, I knew I had made a mistake. But God smiled on me, and the reformatting failed for no apparent reason. But the drive volume’s disk directory was badly damaged. None of the data was accessible. I quickly opened TechTools Pro and I could see the drive was full. So I thought, maybe my data was intact.

I thought I had might have a chance to save my images, if I could just get to them! But TechTools Pro would not even mount. I felt sick. Almost a year of pictures probably lost. I quickly upgraded my TechTools Pro to version 9 (cha ching sound effect). I even talked with their tech support team. They told me there was no way to save it. TechTools Pro couldn’t even find any old files to rescue. Piet Van den Eynde suggested I try Disk Drill and at least try to rescue as many photos as I could. Remember, we are talking over a year’s worth of images mixed in with over 300 thousand images!

I bought Disk Drill (cha ching), it worked a little better. It found the disk and was able to recover around a thousand images before timing out or getting stuck. What was worse was, none of the recovered image were the ones I didn’t have backed up. So I was encouraged there were still images on the disk! But I wasn’t getting the right ones off.

I couldn’t think about this anymore. I needed to think about my mother. I put all this off till I returned in late March. After returning in March, I retried both TechTools Pro 9 and Disk Drill again. Disk Drill kept timing out or getting stuck. TechTools Pro wasn’t able to do much of anything. Apparently, the file structure was too badly mangled and nothing was going to work. I consulted more people I knew; everyone told me just format the drive and enjoy the “new” 6TB of storage. Part of me knew there must be a way.

I researched the net, and several folks said that Disk Warrior, by Alsoft had helped them in impossible situations. I used to own an older copy before a while back. Never felt it was any better than TechTools Pro. So why waste the money?

Time went by and I put the drive aside. I wouldn’t think about it again until I would find an image in Lightroom and see that the file was missing. I would get that sick feeling all over again.

Then yesterday I opened Disk Drill once again, and it wanted to do an update. I updated the software and… no luck. Same story. It stalled after a few minutes.

This got me thinking again. I decided to try Disk Warrior and give it one last try before I reformatted the whole drive. I found my old serial number and bought an $79 upgrade (cha ching). Alsoft sure didn’t make it simple. They won’t just let you buy it and download it. I had to wait 15 plus hours for them to mail me a USB drive with the software on it. Only after they mailed it would they email me a link. A link, that would then send me to yet another link that would in turn send me via email a 20 mg install file! Why not just let me download my software from their website? Go figure.

But this morning I got the download link and later the file arrived. I then installed it and started to run Disk Warrior 5 while I went for breakfast. After breakfast, I saw it was doing something. Things were churning, and progress bars were moving. Should I get my hopes up? No! I went to brush my teeth and when I came back it was done. It said it had successfully rebuilt my hard drive! WHAT!!!! YES! It had, and I quickly mounted the drive, and all my files were there!! Everything is where I left it and no errors. The whole drive is back to normal. Thank you Alsoft!

I can’t say enough about Disk Warrior. If you don’t have it GET IT NOW!! 5 Stars!!

Money to Take Their Photo: Trophy Hunter Photography

Indian women in the step well near Kheri Gate, Amer, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. These are local women we met, asked them to pose and paid them. We spoke with them to great length and worked out the details for our group to shoot. Once it was over, they were happy and we were happy.

 

Recently PetaPixel posted an article that created a huge controversy among its readers. So much so that they actually took down the article, though you can still find the original article on the author’s site. The PetaPixel article was entitled, “How to Deal with Locals Who Ask You for Money to Take Their Photo” and created a stir because of its hugely ethnocentric bias. Now, let me stop here and give a caveat. Some of you might feel I have no “dog in this fight”, meaning, I have nothing to add because I myself am a middle (upper middle) aged, white male. Three strikes right there. But let me suggest that I might be able to add a little insight to this debacle as I have over 23 years of living in Asia under this expanding belt of mine.

How Did We Get Here?

First off, the article was written from the perspective of a Westerner rather than a global citizen. I don’t even know where to begin, when every paragraph is headed up with a photo of a white person having their picture taken with a local resident. It just felt creepy from the start. Then with statements like, “For instance, be aware that many middle-aged men who ask for money are planning to buy alcohol”  or “As you may know, developing countries are very money-orientated cultures.” Seriously?  Wow, they just lost any credibility they may have had in two sentences.

Dare I say, we are looking at this through the wrong lens. We are asking the wrong questions. The question isn’t, “Should we pay people for their photos?” The more interesting and maybe a more important question is “How did we get here?”

Before the advent of the ubiquitous digital camera, before the democratization of photography and travel – back when travel was rare and a kitted out SLR or rangefinder was unheard of – people traveled for a different reason. Sure, the uber rich took safaris to the “Dark Continent” to take home a trophy they bagged from the comfort of their Land Rover. Out of that horrible experience grew the rarer still photo safari. As yet, the photographic workshop was something of dreams.

Travel for Travel’s Sake

Back in the early ‘90s when I first moved to India we lead tours. Not photo tours – real honest-to-goodness tours, based in culture and education – my wife and I spend two years in language and culture acquisition before we hung out our shingle (so to speak).

It was during these two years that we learned less about how to say something and more about why Indians say something. It is taking time like this that you learn to view a different culture with an open mind. You learn never to say words like, “They always…” or “ They never…”. Because you learn that the truth is, there is always someone breaking the stereotype. In culture, there are no absolutes.

When people joined our tours, they came to learn and experience this vastly different culture of India, the camera was an afterthought for the most part. It was only there to take home memories, not make a trophy. Locals enjoyed having their photos made and the thought to ask for money for something like a photo was absurd. They would no sooner ask their friend to pay them for a photo then they would their new foreign guest. How rude would that be!

Trophy Hunter Travelers

But then around the turn of the century something happened. It is what sociologists call the democratisation of knowledge and technology. With the digital age and the internet came the ability to travel both virtually and physically and do it cheaply. Cameras became cheaper and more available to the masses. Everyone wanted to be Steve McCurry and photograph their “Afghan Girl.”

Without going into the debate about McCurry’s ethics of setting up photos, the big difference is McCurry was on assignment. He was one of the few and the elite that were charged with telling a story about a culture. The rest of us just dreamed about the opportunity. But now the masses were able to afford a DSLR and a 70-200mm lens and a cheap ticket to the Taj Mahal and now everyone can try be McCurry. And to be honest, with amazing results. Some amazing photos filtered up through the centillion of pixels burned over the years.

On our tours, we had a rule, that you could not take a photo until everyone in the group asked our hosts at least one question. Contrived – but it made sure people interacted with our hosts.

 

The Disillusioned Travel Photographer

But something happened. Everyone (yes, I am now generalizing) has started to become jaded. Both photographer and subject now feel things are due them, entitled. As a photographer, that leads photo workshops myself, I have seen participants lose patience in the exploration of culture and want to simply get the photo and move to the next one.

We are missing the travel experience. I venture to say there are too many photographers who visit a country or culture and never see it with their naked eye – they only view it with through their camera lens. They don’t stop and drink the tea, or to smoke the hookah. They don’t bother to explore. They don’t ask questions of their host. Heck, they don’t even have a host!

Locals have gone from being hosts to becoming makeshift models. I am not talking about professional or even semi-professional models. At the risk of starting another flame fest, my workshops are known to hire locals to work as a model, we pay them well for their time and their services. What I am talking about is the shopkeeper or tradesman that sits and does their daily routine.

The guest photographer (and that is what we are, a guest) walks up, sticks a camera up, takes a photo and walks away. Often without even an exchange of pleasantries and no knowledge of what is unfolding in front of them. In doing this we, the photographers have treated them as disposable models and so why would they not want to be paid? Photographers doing this do both a great disservice to themselves as well as the culture they visit. They are missing the “story” and they risk portraying a stereotype of the culture they are visiting. I am guilty of this, it is too easy to do. It is hard to take time, to slow down, to talk with someone that might not even speak your language.

2 Steps Forward, 1 Step Back

This is a tension I have lived with for years. I find myself taking one step forward and two steps back. Clients, want a trophy photo, they want to feel their time is well spent. In other words, they are getting what they have paid for. I understand this. But there are bigger forces at play here. As a workshop leader, I need to curate my clients’ experience so they they get what they want and in doing so we respect the culture and society we are a guest in.

So what do we do about it? The genie is out of the bottle and there is no putting him back. We can’t change a cultural revolution or in this case a technological one or the side effects it has had on the world we live in. We can only change ourselves. We can only be responsible for who we are and how we react to the culture we are visiting.

I think we need to structure our workshops as experiences rather than events or hunts. In an experience we take time to participate and to enter into a shared time of discovery. Both by us as well as by the culture we are visiting. The experience is the end, the goal. On the contrary, a hunt is about one thing, the trophy. Whatever it takes to walk away with a trophy and damn the culture, full speed ahead.

Somehow, as a workshop leader, I need to make the experience and the discovery just as much a part of the trip (maybe more) as the trophy. By doing this we lessen the impact we have on our hosts, we educate and promote cross cultural understanding in a time where this is of the utmost importance. Maybe, just maybe, we can start a new revolution or awakening in travel photography.

 

Related links:

DEAR BEGINNER, YOU MAKE RIPPLES!
BE A CULTURAL INSIDER AND GET BETTER PHOTOGRAPHS. (PT.1)
BE A CULTURAL INSIDER AND GET BETTER PHOTOGRAPHS. (PT.2)

 

Comprehensive review: Think Tank Photo – Airport Takeoff V2 Photo Bag

 

If you are like me you spend a lot of time hauling camera gear from flight to flight. Most (though not all) roller bag camera bags work fine rolling along the airport mall (is that the right term?) The issue comes when you need to beat that crowd to the immigration queue and the only way to do this is to take the stairs verses the escalator. But you have a roller bag! Well, for years Think Tank Photo has had your back, quite literally. How? With the Airport Takeoff. This bag has long address this problem by being both a roller bag and a backpack. But things just got better with their release of version 2! Now this bag is 15% lighter, and this means you can now pack another lens or two, or perhaps even another X-T2 or X-Pro2. It also now sports a new handle, stronger and with less shake than the previous one. New pockets and more. Basically they took a great bag and made it better.

Above is my comprehensive video review of this bag. I also took time to do a detailed comparison with my all time favorite bag in the same class, the Airport Roller Derby. How does it compare? Well you ‘ll have to watch and see. 😉

On paper here are the features and specs:

KEY FEATURES

  • Pocket for tripod mount or water bottle on side (Additional straps included for larger tripods)
  • Cable and combination lock included for securing the lockable zippers
  • YKK RC Fuse zippers, ballistic nylon, high-density velex and closed-cell PU
    foam are the highest quality materials in the industry
  • Top compartment cradles large camera bodies for a perfect fit
  • Interior zippered pockets for batteries, CF cards, filters and accessories
  • Custom-designed, high-performance, 80mm wheels with sealed ABEC grade 5 bearings for quiet rolling
  • User-replaceable retractable handle, wheels and feet
  • Extra tall wheel housings protect bag from scrapes and scratches
  • Seam-sealed rain cover included
  • Grab handles on three sides for lifting bag into the overhead bin
  • Reinforced dividers support heavy gear and maintain strength over time
  • Business card holder on top for identification

PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS

  • Internal Dimensions: 13” W x 18.5” H x 5.3– 6.8” D (33 x 47 x 13–17 cm)
  • Exterior Dimensions: 14” W x 21” H x 8” D (35.5 x 53 x 22 cm)
  • Laptop Pocket: 11.4” W x 16.3” H x 1.4” D (29 x 41.5 x 3.6 cm) (Fits a 17″ laptop)
  • Tablet Pocket: 9.8” W x 9.4” H x 0.8” D (25 x 24 x 2 cm) (Fits a 10″ tablet)
  • Weight: 7.0–8.7 lbs. (3.2–3.9 kg) depending on accessories used

In the video jump to the review at 4:00
Jump to the comparative review between the Airport Roller Derby & the Airport Takeoff 7:57

Links to product (yes, it’s an affiliate link):
Think Tank Photo AIRPORT TAKEOFF™ v2: http://dtrekker.com/TTP-Takeoff
Think Tank Photo AIRPORT ROLLER DERBY™: http://dtrekker.com/TTP_rollerderby
Think Tank Photo AIRPORT INTERNATIONAL™ V3.0: http://dtrekker.com/TTP_intlv3

In this review, I look in detail at the Airport Takeoff v2. It’s new features and just what fits in it and what doesn’t. I also compare the Take off to two other roller bags; the Airport International, Roller Derby.
Music: Severe Tire Damage Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b…

6 Ways to Improve your Photography Portfolio: The Goldilocks Principle


 

I call it the Goldilocks Principle in editing. Of course, you remember the story of Goldilocks. The little girl who stumbled into a cabin with three bowls of porridge and three beds. One bowl of porridge was too hot, one too cold and one was just right. In the same way, one bed was too hard, one too soft, but one was just right. Apparently, Goldilocks was a ruthless editor. She didn’t settle for anything but what she wanted. She didn’t settle for anything – she knew what she wanted. If Goldilocks were a photographer, she would have a killer portfolio.

Over this past week or so I have been working with a photographic mentee/student. The biggest issue out of the gate has been she has way too many photos in her portfolio. Many of which are not up to the standard of what she is capable of. I get it. Being ruthless to one of your children is hard. As photographers, we have to be disciplined and practice tough love on our portfolio. We want to allow viewers to leave wanting more. Here are six principles (questions) to help you do just that.

1. Is the image technically correct?

 

By “technically correct” I mean is it exposed correctly; is the subject, whatever that might be, in focus or is it soft? Did you push the ISO too far is it grainy?

I love intentionally blurry images. But if an image is blurry because of carelessness then, most of the time it needs to be tossed (there is that happy accident). Soft images are not artistic, they are…well, soft. If a photo is not your best work then it doesn’t need to be in your portfolio. As far as a soft image in your portfolio is concerned, there is one exception, and this brings us to the second point.

2. Does the image show emotion?

 

Emotion is a powerful force and can cover a multitude of technical sins.

There is a passage in the Bible that says, “…love covers a multitude of sins.” (1 Peter 4:8). In this case, we can broaden the emotion of love to almost any type of visible emotion; anger, sadness, laughter, really any emotion that can appear on a subject’s face can cover or shall we say, override many technical errors. We see this in photojournalism all the time. An image with powerful emotion trumps a technically flawless one without emotion. Some people might argue that John Filo’s Pulitzer Prize–winning photograph of Mary Ann Vecchio, a 14-year-old runaway, kneeling over the body of Jeffrey Miller during the Kent State shootings was technically flawed. In the original photo, we see a pole that appears to be sticking up through Vecchio’s head. But the image is so profound and so full of emotion that this isn’t important. Emotion in a picture trumps almost any other compositional or technical aspect.

So all this to say, does your photo have emotion? If it does, then there is a good chance it’s a keeper.

3. Is the subject the subject?

 

Don’t be afraid to move in close to your subject.

Do your photos have clear subjects? Ok, so you have a photo of a village. Why? What’s in it? Is there a person that important? Maybe a building that is unique? Is there an unusual pattern or shadow at play? The viewer’s eyes need to be drawn to something. If we can’t see it pretty quick, then it’s pointless. It just isn’t interesting.

I often see images by students that are shot wide. I love shooting with a wide angle lens, but you have to make sure that in a wide image there is a clear subject for the viewer to focus on. When shooting a wide or ultra wide lens, think about putting the subject off-center, nearer the edge of the frame, this might add a slight amount of distortion, but this could help the subject be more dominant within the frame.

Always remember the famous quote by war photographer, Robert Capa “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.”

4. Is the image uniquely mine?

 

Look at your image and ask yourself, “Is this my image or am I trying to channel Steve McCurry?” It is ok to be influenced by other photographers or artist, but don’t try to be them. We already have a Steve McCurry or an Amy Vitale. What we need is a [insert your name here] image. If there is one thing I see the most on my workshops is participants trying to be Steve McCurry. Find your style. I have had many people tell me that they can always tell a Matt Brandon image. I am not sure that is entirely true, but it does tell me that I have created a unique style of my own and this is just what you want to achieve. How do you do this?

Honestly, it happens over time. You take influences from those significant photographers and you borrow a little of this and a bit of that. Everyone is influenced by a mentor. That’s kind of the point on a mentor. I doubt anyone’s style is 100% their own, certainly not from the start. But over time you mold it to what you like and who you are and it becomes your photography, your style.

 

5. Does the images have context?

 

This photo is rich with context. A Hindu priest leaves a temple that is adorned with the Indian imagery.

I like my images to tell a story and a good story needs context. Imagine I am telling you a story, but all I did was describe how the main character looked. I don’t say what country the story takes place. I don’t say anything about the weather or if the location is crowded or not (not to mention develop a plot). All I do is describe the person. That is no story. If all you ever make is tight portraits, then your portfolio is going show you are a portrait photographer. Maybe that’s all you want. But if you want to keep people’s interest, mix things up. Shoot wide, medium and close-up and include context. Mix up your lenses. I shoot primarily with a wide-angle, 10-24mm (16-35mm full frame). Why? It includes context.

Many, many years ago, (1985?) I had a National Geographic photographer do a short portfolio review for me. I had two images of two different little Nepali girls. Each image was a tight head and shoulders crop of a shirtless child in black and white. I thought they were stunning. His comment was, “I have no clue as to where this photo was taken; New York? In a studio? India? You need to pull out and give me context!” He was right. If you are taking “travel” imagery, then allow the viewer to travel through the image. Travel images need to transport people to the location of the photo. We do this through context.

Context can be communicated through anything from clothing like a turban or a ratty t-shirt to writing on a wall, or a statue. These give contextual clues to the location, timing, and environment of the photo.

6. Was the image premeditated?

 

 

What do I mean by that? So many photos I see in carelessly or quickly edited portfolios are images that were taken on the fly. Photo walks can be fun but in my opinion, rarely provide the photographer with images that are well thought through and executed. I can almost always pick out a photo that was “snapped” on the fly. These images feel like a stolen moment and often convey a sense of voyeurism. Your images need to be premeditated, thought through and executed. What angle will communicate the best context? Do I want the subject camera aware or not? What you leave out of the frame is just as important as what you put in, and if you are grabbing an image on the fly, then you are, in the words of Ansel Adams, not making a photograph, you are taking it.

In the image above I saw the yak butter lamps and the light and I knew I wanted to photograph them. But the lamps by themselves were not very interesting, at least not to me. I knew it needed more to make a story. So I waited for the human element; people lighting the lamps. I shot the photo with one hand lighting the candles. It was, OK. But, then another person entered the frame and added symmetry. This was the shot.

There are more points I can add to this list, but if you will just concentrate on these six points and not be satisfied with cold porridge and hard beds, you will have upped the quality of your portfolio several times over. Go be Goldilocks!

Feb 2017 Varanasi Lighting Workshop

Here is a quick look at the recent Master Class in Lighting and Portraiture that Piet Van den Eynde and I led in Delhi and Varanasi, India, this past February.  I gotta say, the workshop went off close as planned, and that’s pretty good for a workshop ran in India. In India, anything can happen and usually does. There are always a few hiccups and bumps along the way in any field-based photographic workshop. In spite of that, I feel that I walked away with some really stellar shots and I saw some amazing photos by participants as well.

 

Varsha Dasgupta poses as the god Ganesh.

 

Era Dogra looks through the veil in this kathak pose.

We started the trip off with two days in Delhi. This gave us just enough time to visit some of our favorite haunts.  But the highlight of our Delhi time for me was the model shoot we worked out. A few years back while visiting Humayun’s Tomb in New Delhi, we met some very fun and quirky young ladies. They asked us to take their photos and of course “friend” them on Facebook. I soon came to know that one of the young ladies was a traditional kathak dancer. One thing led to another and soon we had a photo shoot of beautiful Indian dancers for our New Delhi portion of the workshop. What a great way to start the trip!

After our time in Delhi, we took the night train to the holy city of  Varanasi. Here we had previously arraigned photo opportunities as well as models for the group to photograph. To call a few of eccentric holy men models, might be a stretch. But we did work it out with several to be our photographic subjects aka model. Together, we photographed them on the river bank, in buildings, around temples and even on boats.

Below is a set of a few images from this trip. I hope you enjoy them.

 

 

Of course, we didn’t set everything up. You can tell from the selection of photos above, we did a lot of walking around flower markets, fish markets and even visited a traditional Indian wrestling club where everything was spontaneous. We were lucky, this time at the wrestling club, they didn’t have Piet and I strip down to our skivvies like the last time we visited.

When is the next workshop?

 

 

Overall it was an amazing time and one that stretched all of us to try new things and come up with new and exciting images. If you want to join us for the next workshop, we will be offering it this coming Nov 26th through Dec 3rd. But this time we will be replacing Delhi with Kolkata! What an amazing city. Did you know that Kolkata is the last remaining place on the planet where you can still find and photograph hand-pulled rickshaws? It’s true! If you are interested in joining us, be sure to sign up so you know when registration for the workshop goes live. Last time the workshop sold out in an hour. You don’t want to just check your blog feed and hope you time it right. We will be letting subscribers to our newsletter know in advance the day and time when registration will go live. This past workshop I asked participants who they got in on the registration so quick. almsot every one of them said they set their alarms. As such I will give you a hint, we move the timing so folks from the U.S. all they way to Asia will not have to wake up in the middle of the night. But you will need to sign up now so we can let you know the timing. You know what they say, “Timing is everything!”

Don’t miss the next Master Class because you were sleeping. Want to know in advance when registration will go live? Then, remember to sign up for my newsletter if you want to be notified first. 

A Tribute to Phyllis Brandon, My Mother


 

My mother is what Christian’s refer to as a “Godly woman.” To take that out of Christianese and put it in plain English, would be, she was a woman that mirrored the teachings of Jesus Christ in her life. She loved things that were good; she hated that which was evil. She was concerned for the unfortunate and the downtrodden. She “lived in peace with all men in so far as it was possible” and more. She brought up her children with these morals and ethics as well.

This past week on March 21st, after a running battle with kidney disease she passed away. She went to be with her loving Lord and those of whom she love that went before her.

It was a struggle to be here. Not because I had other things to do – but, because I had to watch my mother die. She passed under the care of my sister Terry Brandon who lived with her for the past eight plus years. Terry devoted her life to Mom, and I am sure extended her life by many years. But in the end, after only eight months of dialysis Mom couldn’t take the pain and suffering of the treatment. So, on the 3rd of March, she stopped her treatment.

I was in India running my workshop knowing she was planning this decision. I prayed I would be able to make it back in time to see her before she slipped into a toxic sleep. In fact, Alou and I did, and Mom defied all odds and lasted for three weeks off dialysis.

In tribute to her, her life and what she meant to her family and friends I was asked to make a short video of her life. The video will be played at her memorial service today. This project has been an excellent way to grieve and process this time with my family. I even was able to interview Mom for the video before she lost the ability to speak near the end.

As you can imagine this has been a hugely personal project for me. I want to thank my sister Mindy Brandon Hamm for many of the photos and her creative collaboration.
Music by:

Song: Quiet City
Artist: Aaron Copland, London Symphony Orchestra & New Philharmonia Orchestra
Album: A Copland Celebration, Vol. I

Song: Nonet for Strings: Slow and Solemn
Artist: Aaron Copland, London Symphony Orchestra & New Philharmonia Orchestra
Album: A Copland Celebration, Vol. I

ADHD and How I cope with it.

I was diagnosed with dyslexia back somewhere close to 1974. In those days many phycologists and other said the same thing about dyslexia that people are saying today about ADHD, “It’s just an “American disease” or “only problem with that kid is the way he was raised.” Now, of course, we know this isn’t the case at all. We have fMRIs that show there is something different going on in the brain of someone with either dyslexia or ADD.

Photographers who are ADD, ADHD or dyslexics are faced with unique challenges that other creatives and business people don’t face. In this video, I look at ways to cope with these differences.

If you are ADD or dyslexia, I would love to hear how you have learned to cope and excel in a world that isn’t attuned to they way you function.

I mention that I would link my packing Pro list so folks can download it. You will find it linked below. I hope it helps. Just use it as a starting point and tailor it to your need.


I am not sure I will have a video next week as I am leading a workshop inIndia with my good friend and workshop partner Piet Van den Eynde. But check back soon for a report of the week’s events.

Vlog #15

 

This video was spur of the moment. Photographer friend Pete DeMarco and I decided at the last minute to go out and try to shoot a seascape at a local beach here in Penang. While waiting for the sun to drop we started chatting about the camera he uses, the Sony a7ii. One thing led to another, and this video was born.

The Sony a7ii is a very cool, mirrorless camera. It is full frame and-and yet small, as a mirrorless camera should be. But what intrigues me is it can use apps. Go figure! In this episode, we look at the Smooth Refection app. Pete demonstrates how to use the app, and its effects.

This week’s tip is about geotagging your photos with the Fujifilm Camera Remote app.

Please subscribe to my video channel and my newsletter. We are about to announce a new photo workshop, and newsletter subscribers get the first option to signup. Only after the first 24 hours has past will we release it to the public. Our last workshop sold out in less than one hour!

Smooth Refection App: http://dtrekker.com/sony_smooth

Fujifilm Camera Remote App on iTunes: http://dtrekker.com/fuji-remote

Fujifilm Camera Remote App on Google Play: http://dtrekker.com/Fuji_Remote_Android

Remember to SUBSCRIBE to my channel:

Pete DeMarco’s links:

Website: http://www.thenomadwithin.com/

FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/PeteDeMarcoPhotography/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/petedemarco/