The On Field Media Project, Teaching NGOs to Tell Their Own Stories

Digital Storytelling.001

“Photographs are the portal to one’s first impression of a non-profit’s mission via their website. Having amateurs do that work is always a serious compromise. The staff might know the stories but that doesn’t mean they can translate them into effective visual narrative. Just my opinion.” This was a recent comment addressed to me on Facebook after I posted about our recent On Field Media Project training in Africa. I left this persons name off the quote because they deleted the comment, I am not sure why. Maybe they had a change of heart. But I know there are other photographers who feel this same way. To me, this is old, classic, and somewhat colonial thinking. It’s a antiquated mindset that has to be challenged.

To the professional photographers who may be threatened by an organization hoping to empower other organizations to tell their own story through photos, let me make a few things clear.

I know a lot of professional photographers and a hand full of those call themselves, “humanitarian” photographers. By that I mean, only a handful of them try to make an earning by photographing non-profits exclusively. Having traveled down that career path myself I can speak with a certain amount of authority – most humanitarian photographer struggle to find work because most of their potential clients have little, if any, budget to hire them. Within my world, I know of only two humanitarian photographers living off their work as humanitarian photographers: Esther Havens and Gary Chapman. I am sure there are a few more that I don’t know about. Other photographers like myself, supplement their income from humanitarian work through other work such as photo workshops, ebooks, video tutorials, wedding photography etc. I also know of a few photographers doing their humanitarian work pro-bono. Trust me when I say nobody is in danger of losing work by teaching a non-profit to take their own photos.

Even if an NGO wanted your services and could pay you your rate, there are still thousands, maybe millions of NGOs left over that can’t pay. Let’s look at just one country, India. India alone has over 3.3 million non-profits.1 That’s more than the number of primary schools and public health centers in India combined. This is an old study done in 2008, so think about how many more non-profits there are in India in 2015! I don’t believe there are enough photographers out there that are willing to do this much pro-bono work. As such, we have a huge amount of non-profits that are not be serviced with fresh images.

 

bresson quote

Let’s address the concern that, just because “the staff might know the stories … doesn’t mean they can translate them into effective visual narrative.”? I think this is a bit of an elitist attitude. So is the author saying that, just because someone isn’t trained as a photographer, they can’t learn the art of photography? That doesn’t even make sense. Photography is taught everywhere: On the internet, in classrooms, in photo workshops, in mentorship programs, everywhere! Henri Cartier-Bresson, the father of modern day photojournalism2 once said, “In photography, visual organization can stem only from a developed instinct.” How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice, practice, practice. You can learn composition, you can be taught visual weight, you can be guided by the rule of thirds. I teach the geek this stuff at every photo workshop. It goes the other way as well. You can teach f-stops, shutter speeds, IOS, exposure compensation and more. The West, the affluent, and the privileged do not hold the corner of knowledge, art, and skills.

Maybe this person thinks we are just passing them a camera and saying “Take images as good as Matt Brandon’s or Esther Havens”. They can’t do that right away. In fact many may never be able to take photos on par with Gary Chapman or David DuChemin. But they don’t have to. It’s less about a fine art image and more about capturing a moment. In fact, these NGO workers are uniquely suited for finding great stories and being their when it unfolds.

In a recent study commissioned by the NPPA on what make a photograph worth publishing3 Sara Quinn, the researcher, tested 52 people with 200 images and in her summary of what she found she states, “Quality matters, [the 52 people tested] said . And quality in photojournalism is all about strength of story, a genuine moment, rare access, and a perspective on what’s happening in the world.” Let me repeat that, “strength of story, a genuine moment, rare access and a perspective on what’s happening in the world”. That is a beautiful description of non-profit field worker.

The non-profit field worker experiences strong stories daily. On this past trip to Kenya to train The Kilgoris Project‘s senior staff how to identify, tell, and photograph a good story, their staff caught on quickly. I was in a Land Cruiser with Collins, a staff member with TKP, as we passed some donkeys carrying charcoal and he casually said, “You know, that would be a good story”. “Ok”, I said, “tell me.” He went on to tell me an amazing story about how these ladies walk 30 kilometers over the course of three days to collect the charcoal and, on this trek,  they suffer many hardships, such as severe weather and sleeping outside among wild animals, like hennas and leopards. Then, right as their trip concludes, it is not uncommon for corrupt officials to snatch their charcoal without payment and for their own personal use. Throughout the week we kept hearing story after story just as strong as this.

Because field staff like the TKP’s are locals, they have an intimate and rare access to life that outsiders like me will never see. A local NGO staff is made up of the majority of what is known in sociology as cultural “insiders”. According to a paper by Ghassan Hage, “Insiders and Outsiders in Beilharz and Hogan”4 an insider is defined as, “… someone who perceives that this collective order of things is their own. Thus, they feel that their ‘I’ can legitimately speak the ‘we’ of the collective identification with the law. He or she can say ‘this is our law’ or ‘this is our way of doing things’. ” In other words, a unique  “perspective on what’s happening in the world” and because they are insiders they are allowed into moments in which someone like me could only hope to experience someday. I lived in India for 13 years and, at the end, people would still point to me as I entered a restaurant and say rather loudly, Aṅgrēza! or Englishman! In India, even though I speak Hindustani, even though I wear local traditional clothing, no matter how much I contextualized, I remained an outsider. But the TKP staff like all local field staff will never have this boundary. They are insiders that can identify a story, get rare access to that story, be there when that genuine moment happens, and then photograph it with a unique perspective on what’s happening in their world.

So really all that’s left is to teach them is the mechanics of a camera and help them, as Bresson says, to develop visual organization, or the eye. By the way, the genuine moments in photography always trump technical perfection and even composition. Go back and look at some of the great images in photojournalism and you will see. You can start with this old post of mine HERE.

All that being said, these local field staff can be taught to use a camera and how to see and photograph a quality image. Here are some examples from OFMP’s last training In Kilgoris, Kenya. I want you to understand this was their first assignment. Not their fifth or sixth. Frankly, this is on par with some of my Western workshop participant’s work. That is not to take away from my Western workshop participants, it is to say that most of my workshop participants have really nice cameras and years of practice. For Willy, David, Collins, and Juma this was their first time photographing a story like this. In fact for a few of them, this was the first photo lesson they had every had.

 

"How a Cell Tower Change Kilgoris" Photographed by Collins Odhiambo

“How a Cell Tower Change Kilgoris” Photographed by Collins Odhiambo

 

 "The Brick Maker" Photographed by Wilfred Lemiso

“The Brick Maker” Photographed by Wilfred Lemiso

 

The Day in the life of a 'jiko' Maker" Photographed by Sa'Konzoni Z Juma

The Day in the life of a ‘jiko’ Maker” Photographed by Sa’Konzoni Z Juma

 

"The Gardener" Photographed by David Lemiso

“The Gardener” Photographed by David Lemiso

 

So what does that lion at the top of the post have to do with this article? For centuries, the West has told the story of the people of Africa, India, and many other less-developed countries. It’s time they started telling their own story. OFMP wants to empower them to do just that. We want to give the lion back his voice.

 

  1. GuideStar India, 2009 http://southasia.oneworld.net/news/india-more-ngos-than-schools-and-health-centres#.VTixkhdO2Fk
  2.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henri_Cartier-Bresson
  3. “Eyetracking Photojournalism: New research explores what makes a photograph memorable, shareable, and worth publishing”, by By Sara Quinn,https://nppa.org/news/eyetracking-photojournalism-new-research-explores-what-makes-photograph-memorable-shareable-and
  4. “Insiders and Outsiders in Beilharz and Hogan” by Ghassan Hage, http://www.academia.edu/1596849/Insiders_and_Outsiders

Views of Kenya with the Fujinon XF 16mm f/1.4 WR

Fujinon XF 16mm f/1.4 WR Well balanced, but it couldn't be called a small lens.

Fujinon XF 16mm f/1.4 WR Well balanced, but it couldn’t be called a small lens.

 

Fujinon XF 16mm f/1.4 WR with it's tulip lens hood attached.

Fujinon XF 16mm f/1.4 WR with it’s tulip lens hood attached.

So just before I left for Kenya, I got a WhatsApp message from my contact at Fujifilm Malaysia telling me they had the yet-to-be-released Fujifilm XF 16mm f/1.4 R WR. I have been waiting for this lens since it showed up on the Fujifilm Lens Road Map. A 16mm f/ 1.4? That’s a lot of light!  But the real question was going to be, would I feel it was wide enough? Let’s face it, a 16mm lens on the X-system is effectively a 24mm in 35mm-speak and I generally like shooting wide. I like fast even better. This lens has not disappointed me.

f/1.4, 1/2000 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/2000 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

 

f/1.4, 1/1250 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/1250 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1


I really wanted to write this review before leaving and post it the day the lens was officially announced, but unfortunately I got the lens only the day before I left for Kenya and I have been working on an OFMP training everyday since I arrived. I was able to carve out a few moments here and there to put this little guy through some of it’s paces.

 

f/4, 1/10 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/4, 1/10 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1


Speaking of little, this actually isn’t all that small. It dwarfs the Fuji 14mm f/2.8. It’s bigger than the 23mm f/1.4 and the real shocker is, it is even slightly bigger than the 56mm f/1.2! I am not sure I understand why it needs to be this size. I understand the weight. It weighs right in between the 23mm and the 56mm at 375 g (0.83 lb), about where I expected. After all, it’s loaded with glass. But I don’t understand the size. It’s slightly bigger than the 56mm that is 3.5 times longer in focal length. But what this lens looses in size, it makes up in sharpness. Like many of the other Fujinon lenses, the 16mm is razor sharp. You need to be careful because you’ll cut yourself, its so sharp. It’s sharp at f/16 all the way to f/1.4. I was thoroughly surprised to see this lens was not only sharp in the center at f/1.4, it was also sharp from edge to edge.

 

f/10, 1/160 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/10, 1/160 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

 

I have yet to discover any chromatic aberrations at any f-stop. It’s here where I am suppose to tell you about the 13 lens elements in 11 groups, including 2 aspherical lens elements and the 2 ED glass lens elements to reduce lateral and axial chromatic aberration, but honestly I have no idea what that means, so as Clark Gable once said, “Frankly my dear, I don’t give a damn!”. All I know is it is crazy sharp!

 

f/10, 1/40 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/10, 1/40 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

 

I do know nice-looking bokeh when I see it, and this lens has it. Apparently it has to do with the 9 aperture blades. Again, I am less concerned with why it happens and more concern with “does it look nice?”, and it does.

The lens is weather sealed and becomes a great addition to the the weather sealed X-T1. Twice on this trip I was shooting in the rain and the camera got completely drenched. Not a problem.

 

f/1.4, 1/400 sec, at 16mm, 200 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/400 sec, at 16mm, 200 ISO, on a X-T1

 

f/1.4, 1/550 sec, at 16mm, 200 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/550 sec, at 16mm, 200 ISO, on a X-T1

 

I have read somewhere that this lens was slightly slow focusing using phase detection. Maybe, but I never experienced it. Every time I used it, it seemed to snap to focus as quick as the best Fuji lens.

I want to be fair here; I have not put this lens through a tough regiment of shooting. I just received this lens as I was leaving for an OFMP training at The Kilgoris Project in Kenya and only had a limited amount of time with it. What I can say is I am not disappointed with it. Unlike the 16-55mm, a lens that I felt was a well crafted lens but will never find it’s way into my bag, there is a chance this lens will not come off my camera! It is just wide enough to provide context in photos without creating undo distortion on the edges. It is fast, so it will be useful in low light situations, it is sharp and focuses quickly and accurately. What more can a photographer want? My guess is once I get this lens, my 23mm f/1.4 and my 14mm f/2.8 will stay in my bag a lot more.

 

f/1.4, 1/320 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/320 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

 

Did you know that this is the 4th lens in Fujifilms lens lineup at the 16mm focal length? They have the 10-24mm f/4, the 16-55mm f/2.8 and the XC 16-50mm f/3.5-5.6. None of these are primes and all of them slower, with the fastest being the 16-55mm at f/2.8. It might surprise some of you that I never bought the 10-24mm f/4. As sharp as that lens is, and it is really sharp, I found it too slow at f/4. Yes, I know it has image stabilization (OIS) but that just stabilizes the lens not the subject. When I did use the 10-24mm, it was almost always on at the wider end between the 10 to 16mm focal length. So the new 16mm lens gives me speed at f/1.4 and a nice wide focal length. Do I wish this was a wider lens? Sure. But at the moment, there is no wider lens at this speed on the Fuji Road Map. But I can live with that. This lens hits the sweet spot for me.

 

f/1.4, 1/1250 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/1250 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/60 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/60 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

 

The 16mm seems to have plenty of contrast and shooting at f/1.4 it gives your subject a nice separation from it’s background. It focuses close, as you can see from the tea flower and the daisy image below. I think I was as close as 6 inch or more. The bokeh get more impressive the closer you get to your subject.

 

f/1.4, 1/1800 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/1800 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

 

f/1.4, 1/1250 sec, at 16mm, 200 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/1250 sec, at 16mm, 200 ISO, on a X-T1

f/3.2, 1/90 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/3.2, 1/90 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

 

The lens is suppose to be selling on Amazon for $999… er $1,000. So in the end, it comes down to would I shell out $1,000 for a 16mm f/1.4 lens? The answer is a resounding, “Heck yeah!”

 

f/5, 1/1100 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/5, 1/1100 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

 

f/1.4, 1/1250 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/1250 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/1000 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/1000 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/2500 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/2500 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

 

f/1.4, 1/2000 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

f/1.4, 1/2000 sec, at 16mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

 

f/16, 1/110 sec, at 16mm, 200 ISO, on a X-T1

f/16, 1/110 sec, at 16mm, 200 ISO, on a X-T1

The Komodo Dragon

The Komodo Drangon

The Komodo Dragon

-Click the photos to view the exif data in a lightbox. For those of you who geek out over gear, all images were shot with either a Fujifilm X-T1 used by me or the X-Pro1 used by Jessie.

 

This week is Spring Break for many American schools and even though Jessie’s school is in Malaysia we have the same schedule. So for Jessie’s last spring break in South East Asia we wanted to do something special. We decided to visit Komodo Island and visit the famous Komodo dragons.

We spend three days on a live-aboard boat and visited both Komodo and Rinka islands. Both islands are a part of the Komodo National Park. The Komodo dragon is the closest thing to a living dinosaur there is and frankly, it’s not that far from it. According to Wikipedia, “…recent research suggests the large size of Komodo dragons may be better understood as representative of a relict population of very large varanid lizards (monitor lizards) that once lived across Indonesia and Australia, most of which, along with other megafauna died out after the Pleistocene.”

 

A Komodo dragon on the hunt. Photo by Jessie Brandon

A Komodo dragon on the hunt. Photo by Jessie Brandon

 

So what is the difference between a monitor lizard and a Komodo? Well for one thing, the size. The Komodo gets to be huge! It is the largest living species of lizard, growing to a maximum length of 3 metres (10 ft) in rare cases and weighing up to approximately 70 kilograms (150 lb). 1 They also have saliva that contains from 50 to 80 different bacteria. 2 This cocktail is deadly, once bitten you have about three to four days of agony before you die. That is if you get away. Because unlike the avaerage monitor lizard who runs away before you can even get close, the Komodo is aggressive. Our guides carried a large forked stick to ward them off. He used it once. Frankly, these lizards are terrifying!

 

Photo by Jessie Brandon

Photo by Jessie Brandon

My only regret is there was never anything to give a perspective to the size of these monsters. The closest thing was the photo of Alou and Jessie near one 2.5 meter one. But even that didn’t do the scale of these creatures justice. But I hope you can at least feel something when looking at these photos. We were fortunate in away. In the early ’90s they banned feeding the dragons for the public. Now they only feed them (or so we were told) when a VIP shows up. We happened to arrive on Rinka island the same time as a government dignitary was visiting and so they hung a goat or at least a part of a goat out to lure them in for the official. By the way, the Komodo can smell blood with it’s forked tongue up to 5 km away! I was a little nervous when I cut my leg while trekking in the Rinka forest. Yikes!

It was hard to show the true size of these beasts. Even this one doesn't look like the 2.5 meter he is.

It was hard to show the true size of these beasts. Even this one doesn’t look like the 2.5 meter he is.

 

The Komodos being fed at Rinka island.

The Komodos being fed at Rinka island.

 

Feeding at Rinka island for the Indonesian VIP.

Feeding at Rinka island for the Indonesian VIP.

 

A Komodo dragon in the forest of Komodo island.

A Komodo dragon in the forest of Komodo island.

 

The graceful S curve of the Komodo.

The graceful S curve of the Komodo.

 

This was a massive 2.5 meter male on Komodo island.

This was a massive 2.5 meter male on Komodo island.

 

A young dragon.

A young dragon.

 

We were told, mush of the time visitors only get to see the Komodos laying around in the hot sun like this one.

We were told, much of the time visitors only get to see the Komodos laying around in the hot sun like this one.

 

Another giant male Komodo on Rinka island.

Another giant male Komodo on Rinka island. Photo by Jessie Brandon

 

I young female on Rinka island. Photo by Jessie Brandon

I young female on Rinka island. Photo by Jessie Brandon

 

After eating, with a face full of flies.

After eating, with a face full of flies.

 

The classic Komodo pose for the photographer.

The classic Komodo pose for the photographer.

 

Jessie got nice and close for this portrait. Photo by Jessie Brandon

Jessie got nice and close for this portrait. Photo by Jessie Brandon

 

 

  1. Ciofi, Claudio (2004). Varanus komodoensis. Varanoid Lizards of the World (Bloomington & Indianapolis: Indiana University Press). pp. 197–204. ISBN 0-253-34366-6.
  2. National Geographic

Rajasthan Photo Trek Participants’ Work.

‎© Clare Rowntree

‎© Clare Rowntree

 

Every workshop I lead I try to post some of my participants’ work that was shot during the workshop. I have always been amazed at what the participants see and photograph. Remember, most of the opportunities are found by them, not set up by me.

I hope you join us for my next workshop in Kashmir, India. By the way, the early bird special is soon to run out and the price will be going up on March 15th by $100. Hurry up and sign up now.

 

© Steve Fossum

© Steve Fossum

 

 

 

© George Vourlidis

© George Vourlidis

 

 

 

© Simon Garvey

© Simon Garvey

 

 

© Steve Fossum

© Steve Fossum

 

 

© George Vourlidis

© George Vourlidis

 

© Simon Garvey

© Simon Garvey

 

 

 

Comfort Zones

comfort-zone

 

Recently I heard a really great quote, “Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.” This resonated with me so much when I heard it I even thought, “now here is a quote I could tattoo on my body.” But I didn’t. I liked it because in many ways this has been my life’s motto even without me ever saying it out loud or tattooing it on my arm. It is why in 1987 I visited India, to push myself out of my comfort zone. It is why in 1994 I moved with my new bride to Kashmir and started a small trekking company. I was not content with being comfortable. Then, when in 2007 I moved back to the USA, it took only two years to realize I was getting too comfortable and so we moved to Malaysia. Continue reading

Rajasthan in Black & White

bishnoi.02.19-14.12.09-2

A Bishnoi farmer.

 

This is the first time I have had time to post while running this Rajasthan Photo Trek. We are approaching the halfway mark in our trip. We have a fun group that is enjoying themselves. They are discovering the colors of Rajasthan. It is true, Rajasthan is known for it’s vibrant colors. But sometimes photographers needs to push their boundaries and explore new ways to see old things. This is my fourth time photographing this place and for me this trip has been about light. One of the best ways to explore light is to break it down to highlights and shadows or simply put black & white.

-Click the photos below to view the exif data in a lightbox.

Girl at Nizamudeen

Girl at Nizamudeen

Another girl at Nizamudeen

Another girl at Nizamudeen

 

Sheikh Sultan in Humayun's Tomb.

Sheikh Sultan in Humayun’s Tomb.

 

Jodhpur Sweet factory

 

Jodhpur Man in Turban

 

Jodhpur woman in her kitchen.

Jodhpur woman in her kitchen.

 

Leaving the temple of puja late at night.

Leaving the temple of puja late at night.

Met this man at a tea stall on the way to Pushkar.

Met this man at a tea stall on the way to Pushkar.

 

A proud Rajasthani man on the road to Pushkar.

A proud Rajasthani man on the road to Pushkar.

 

Another man at the tea stall on the road to Pushkar.

Another man at the tea stall on the road to Pushkar.

 

This man makes (or used to) metal chairs like the one he is sitting in.

This man makes (or used to) metal chairs like the one he is sitting in.

 

f/3.6, 1/125 sec, at 14mm, 500 ISO, on a X-T1

A family of pilgrims in Pushkar.

 

f/5, 1/125 sec, at 14mm, 500 ISO, on a X-T1

Mounting his bike after puja. Pushkar, Rajasthan

 

 

Indian Summers: Another Look

 

Alice Whelan played by Jemima West walks through the Simla bazaar. (Note the camera in the lower right and the crew giving direction to an extra in the lower right)

 

This past Sunday Indian Summers premiered. It was everything I had hoped. If you want to watch it, it will be available for 30 days from this post date HERE. You might need a little extra help to get it to play in your region. 😉  But then I am biased. I had such an overwhelming response to my photos of the main characters of this new UK Channel 4 drama, that I wanted to do a follow up with other photos. Today I am posting images of a few more actors that don’t have what some might say a main role. Yet, they still play a key place in the upcoming story line. You’ll also find some wider shots of the setting to give you a feel for Simla, India in 1932. I can’t say anything about what is going to unfold. But I can say that there is passion, suspense, intrigue and of course drama. I am posting photos but I’m not giving you any background to the scenes so you will have to use your imagination or better yet, you’ll have to watch the show to find out how these scenes relate.

 

Henry Lloyd-Hughes as Ralph Whelan

 

Alice Whelan played by Jemima West

Alice Whelan played by Jemima West

 

 

f/1.2, 1/70 sec, at 56mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

Alyy Khan plays Ramu Sood

 

 

f/1.2, 1/950 sec, at 56mm, 250 ISO, on a X-T1

‘Indi’ Nadarajah as Kaiser

 

f/5.6, 1/180 sec, at 12.6mm, 320 ISO, on a X-E2

Patrick Malahide as Lord Willingdon, Viceroy of India Stands in front of his Roll Royce Phantom.

 

 

f/1.2, 1/250 sec, at 56mm, 250 ISO, on a X-T1

Ayesha Dharker as Nalini Ayer

 

 

Guy Williams as Rowntree

 

Ashna Rabheru as Shamshad Dalal

 

Fiona Glascott and Craig Parkinson watch the skills of “tent pegging”.

 

Coolies shift the Raj from New Delhi to Simla when the summer heat arrives.

 

Fiona Glascott as Sarah Raworth at Ivy Cottage.

 

Tea at Ivy Cottage with Jemima West, Julian Fenby, Craig Parkinson and Fiona Glascott.

 

 

Hasina Haque as Jaya

 

Amber Rose Revah and Craig Parkinson hold Adam.

 

Henry Lloyd-Hughes as Ralph Whelan

 

Nikesh Patel as Aafrin Dala and Rick Warden as Ronnie Keane share a moment.

 

Lillete Dubey as Roshana Dalal and Roshan Seth as Darius Dalal

 

 

Aysha Kala as Sooni Dalal soothes he on screen father Darius Dalal played by Roshan Seth.

 

f/2.5, 1/210 sec, at 56mm, 200 ISO, on a X-T1

The dinner party. L to R Rick Warden (with his back to the camera, Jemima West, Olivia Grant, Henry Lloyd-Hughes and sitting Edward Hogg.

 

Rick Warden as Ronnie Keane

 

 

 

MindShift Gear Giveaway: We have a winner!

winnerbadge

 

I am excited to announce the winner of our Mindshift Gear Giveaway. Congratulations Saket Kath. Saket was chosen at random out of 2005 entries! Like I said lucky. Seket will be getting the amazingly functional and elegantly designed MindShift Gear rotation 180º camera backpack. Have you ever missed a great photo because you couldn’t access your camera? The rotation180° backpack’s rotating waist pack will help you get the image by allowing instant access to your primary photo equipment. With ample room for clothing layers and a hydration reservoir, this pack will help you maintain your creative momentum in any environment. Check out the MindShift Gear rotation 180º camera backpack.

Don’t forget, this was all to celebrate our Kashmir, India Photo Workshop & Trek. We still have around 5 spots left. Come join us.

Indian Summers to Premier Feb 15th in UK.

Penang, 2014

Georgetown, Penang, 2014

 

My adopted home, Georgetown, Penang became the unlikely setting for the new UK Channel 4 series, Indian Summers. The series is set in Colonial India in 1932 in the summer capital of Simla. Yes, during these days the British Raj had two capitals: New Delhi during the winter months and Simla, a hill station set in the foothills of the India Himalaya in the hot Indian Summers. Thus the name. Continue reading