The Komodo Dragon

The Komodo Drangon

The Komodo Dragon

-Click the photos to view the exif data in a lightbox. For those of you who geek out over gear, all images were shot with either a Fujifilm X-T1 used by me or the X-Pro1 used by Jessie.

 

This week is Spring Break for many American schools and even though Jessie’s school is in Malaysia we have the same schedule. So for Jessie’s last spring break in South East Asia we wanted to do something special. We decided to visit Komodo Island and visit the famous Komodo dragons.

We spend three days on a live-aboard boat and visited both Komodo and Rinka islands. Both islands are a part of the Komodo National Park. The Komodo dragon is the closest thing to a living dinosaur there is and frankly, it’s not that far from it. According to Wikipedia, “…recent research suggests the large size of Komodo dragons may be better understood as representative of a relict population of very large varanid lizards (monitor lizards) that once lived across Indonesia and Australia, most of which, along with other megafauna died out after the Pleistocene.”

 

A Komodo dragon on the hunt. Photo by Jessie Brandon

A Komodo dragon on the hunt. Photo by Jessie Brandon

 

So what is the difference between a monitor lizard and a Komodo? Well for one thing, the size. The Komodo gets to be huge! It is the largest living species of lizard, growing to a maximum length of 3 metres (10 ft) in rare cases and weighing up to approximately 70 kilograms (150 lb). 1 They also have saliva that contains from 50 to 80 different bacteria. 2 This cocktail is deadly, once bitten you have about three to four days of agony before you die. That is if you get away. Because unlike the avaerage monitor lizard who runs away before you can even get close, the Komodo is aggressive. Our guides carried a large forked stick to ward them off. He used it once. Frankly, these lizards are terrifying!

 

Photo by Jessie Brandon

Photo by Jessie Brandon

My only regret is there was never anything to give a perspective to the size of these monsters. The closest thing was the photo of Alou and Jessie near one 2.5 meter one. But even that didn’t do the scale of these creatures justice. But I hope you can at least feel something when looking at these photos. We were fortunate in away. In the early ’90s they banned feeding the dragons for the public. Now they only feed them (or so we were told) when a VIP shows up. We happened to arrive on Rinka island the same time as a government dignitary was visiting and so they hung a goat or at least a part of a goat out to lure them in for the official. By the way, the Komodo can smell blood with it’s forked tongue up to 5 km away! I was a little nervous when I cut my leg while trekking in the Rinka forest. Yikes!

It was hard to show the true size of these beasts. Even this one doesn't look like the 2.5 meter he is.

It was hard to show the true size of these beasts. Even this one doesn’t look like the 2.5 meter he is.

 

The Komodos being fed at Rinka island.

The Komodos being fed at Rinka island.

 

Feeding at Rinka island for the Indonesian VIP.

Feeding at Rinka island for the Indonesian VIP.

 

A Komodo dragon in the forest of Komodo island.

A Komodo dragon in the forest of Komodo island.

 

The graceful S curve of the Komodo.

The graceful S curve of the Komodo.

 

This was a massive 2.5 meter male on Komodo island.

This was a massive 2.5 meter male on Komodo island.

 

A young dragon.

A young dragon.

 

We were told, mush of the time visitors only get to see the Komodos laying around in the hot sun like this one.

We were told, much of the time visitors only get to see the Komodos laying around in the hot sun like this one.

 

Another giant male Komodo on Rinka island.

Another giant male Komodo on Rinka island. Photo by Jessie Brandon

 

I young female on Rinka island. Photo by Jessie Brandon

I young female on Rinka island. Photo by Jessie Brandon

 

After eating, with a face full of flies.

After eating, with a face full of flies.

 

The classic Komodo pose for the photographer.

The classic Komodo pose for the photographer.

 

Jessie got nice and close for this portrait. Photo by Jessie Brandon

Jessie got nice and close for this portrait. Photo by Jessie Brandon

 

 

  1. Ciofi, Claudio (2004). Varanus komodoensis. Varanoid Lizards of the World (Bloomington & Indianapolis: Indiana University Press). pp. 197–204. ISBN 0-253-34366-6.
  2. National Geographic

Rajasthan Photo Trek Participants’ Work.

‎© Clare Rowntree

‎© Clare Rowntree

 

Every workshop I lead I try to post some of my participants’ work that was shot during the workshop. I have always been amazed at what the participants see and photograph. Remember, most of the opportunities are found by them, not set up by me.

I hope you join us for my next workshop in Kashmir, India. By the way, the early bird special is soon to run out and the price will be going up on March 15th by $100. Hurry up and sign up now.

 

© Steve Fossum

© Steve Fossum

 

 

 

© George Vourlidis

© George Vourlidis

 

 

 

© Simon Garvey

© Simon Garvey

 

 

© Steve Fossum

© Steve Fossum

 

 

© George Vourlidis

© George Vourlidis

 

© Simon Garvey

© Simon Garvey

 

 

 

Comfort Zones

comfort-zone

 

Recently I heard a really great quote, “Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.” This resonated with me so much when I heard it I even thought, “now here is a quote I could tattoo on my body.” But I didn’t. I liked it because in many ways this has been my life’s motto even without me ever saying it out loud or tattooing it on my arm. It is why in 1987 I visited India, to push myself out of my comfort zone. It is why in 1994 I moved with my new bride to Kashmir and started a small trekking company. I was not content with being comfortable. Then, when in 2007 I moved back to the USA, it took only two years to realize I was getting too comfortable and so we moved to Malaysia. Continue reading

Rajasthan in Black & White

bishnoi.02.19-14.12.09-2

A Bishnoi farmer.

 

This is the first time I have had time to post while running this Rajasthan Photo Trek. We are approaching the halfway mark in our trip. We have a fun group that is enjoying themselves. They are discovering the colors of Rajasthan. It is true, Rajasthan is known for it’s vibrant colors. But sometimes photographers needs to push their boundaries and explore new ways to see old things. This is my fourth time photographing this place and for me this trip has been about light. One of the best ways to explore light is to break it down to highlights and shadows or simply put black & white.

-Click the photos below to view the exif data in a lightbox.

Girl at Nizamudeen

Girl at Nizamudeen

Another girl at Nizamudeen

Another girl at Nizamudeen

 

Sheikh Sultan in Humayun's Tomb.

Sheikh Sultan in Humayun’s Tomb.

 

Jodhpur Sweet factory

 

Jodhpur Man in Turban

 

Jodhpur woman in her kitchen.

Jodhpur woman in her kitchen.

 

Leaving the temple of puja late at night.

Leaving the temple of puja late at night.

Met this man at a tea stall on the way to Pushkar.

Met this man at a tea stall on the way to Pushkar.

 

A proud Rajasthani man on the road to Pushkar.

A proud Rajasthani man on the road to Pushkar.

 

Another man at the tea stall on the road to Pushkar.

Another man at the tea stall on the road to Pushkar.

 

This man makes (or used to) metal chairs like the one he is sitting in.

This man makes (or used to) metal chairs like the one he is sitting in.

 

f/3.6, 1/125 sec, at 14mm, 500 ISO, on a X-T1

A family of pilgrims in Pushkar.

 

f/5, 1/125 sec, at 14mm, 500 ISO, on a X-T1

Mounting his bike after puja. Pushkar, Rajasthan

 

 

Indian Summers: Another Look

 

Alice Whelan played by Jemima West walks through the Simla bazaar. (Note the camera in the lower right and the crew giving direction to an extra in the lower right)

 

This past Sunday Indian Summers premiered. It was everything I had hoped. If you want to watch it, it will be available for 30 days from this post date HERE. You might need a little extra help to get it to play in your region. ;-)  But then I am biased. I had such an overwhelming response to my photos of the main characters of this new UK Channel 4 drama, that I wanted to do a follow up with other photos. Today I am posting images of a few more actors that don’t have what some might say a main role. Yet, they still play a key place in the upcoming story line. You’ll also find some wider shots of the setting to give you a feel for Simla, India in 1932. I can’t say anything about what is going to unfold. But I can say that there is passion, suspense, intrigue and of course drama. I am posting photos but I’m not giving you any background to the scenes so you will have to use your imagination or better yet, you’ll have to watch the show to find out how these scenes relate.

 

Henry Lloyd-Hughes as Ralph Whelan

 

Alice Whelan played by Jemima West

Alice Whelan played by Jemima West

 

 

f/1.2, 1/70 sec, at 56mm, 400 ISO, on a X-T1

Alyy Khan plays Ramu Sood

 

 

f/1.2, 1/950 sec, at 56mm, 250 ISO, on a X-T1

‘Indi’ Nadarajah as Kaiser

 

f/5.6, 1/180 sec, at 12.6mm, 320 ISO, on a X-E2

Patrick Malahide as Lord Willingdon, Viceroy of India Stands in front of his Roll Royce Phantom.

 

 

f/1.2, 1/250 sec, at 56mm, 250 ISO, on a X-T1

Ayesha Dharker as Nalini Ayer

 

 

Guy Williams as Rowntree

 

Ashna Rabheru as Shamshad Dalal

 

Fiona Glascott and Craig Parkinson watch the skills of “tent pegging”.

 

Coolies shift the Raj from New Delhi to Simla when the summer heat arrives.

 

Fiona Glascott as Sarah Raworth at Ivy Cottage.

 

Tea at Ivy Cottage with Jemima West, Julian Fenby, Craig Parkinson and Fiona Glascott.

 

 

Hasina Haque as Jaya

 

Amber Rose Revah and Craig Parkinson hold Adam.

 

Henry Lloyd-Hughes as Ralph Whelan

 

Nikesh Patel as Aafrin Dala and Rick Warden as Ronnie Keane share a moment.

 

Lillete Dubey as Roshana Dalal and Roshan Seth as Darius Dalal

 

 

Aysha Kala as Sooni Dalal soothes he on screen father Darius Dalal played by Roshan Seth.

 

f/2.5, 1/210 sec, at 56mm, 200 ISO, on a X-T1

The dinner party. L to R Rick Warden (with his back to the camera, Jemima West, Olivia Grant, Henry Lloyd-Hughes and sitting Edward Hogg.

 

Rick Warden as Ronnie Keane

 

 

 

Indian Summers to Premier Feb 15th in UK.

Penang, 2014

Georgetown, Penang, 2014

 

My adopted home, Georgetown, Penang became the unlikely setting for the new UK Channel 4 series, Indian Summers. The series is set in Colonial India in 1932 in the summer capital of Simla. Yes, during these days the British Raj had two capitals: New Delhi during the winter months and Simla, a hill station set in the foothills of the India Himalaya in the hot Indian Summers. Thus the name. Continue reading

Take a hike: photo trek with Matt Brandon through Kashmir

Our bad ass guide for the Lidderwat trek, Abul Aziz.

Our bad ass guide for the Lidderwat trek, Abul Aziz.

 

I have received a couple of emails asking just how hard is the trekking portion on the Kashmir Photo Trek & Workshop. Before I get into that I need to define a term. Many North Americans are unfamiliar with the term trek or trekking.   The term “trek” simply means to walk or to travel. I used the Digital Trekker as my brand name because frankly mattbrandon.com was taken and I was running a trekking company at the time called Frontier Treks & Tours. So the whole trekking moniker seamed natural. I mean, I was shooting a digital camera and knew way back then digital was the new future. So I became the Digital Trekker. Recently I thought why not add the trekker to my workshops. So I bought the domain IndiaPhotoTreks.com and there you have it, the birth of the photo trek. But it seems the down side to this is people think we will be backpacking all the time. Not always the case.  But there will be times when we will do some hiking. That brings me to where we started this post.

Continue reading

Planning your 2015 Photo Workshop schedule.

I have two workshops scheduled for 2015 and another workshop still in the planning stage at the time of this writing. So photo workshop schedule make sure you include these. Two completely different places featuring two totally different cultures. The first workshop of this year (that isn’t sold out) is the Kashmir Valley Photo Trek.  Everything you need to know about this is below. Please check it out.

The second workshop is the aptly named  Photography Tour of Bhutan run by the amazing photographer and my good friend Robert van Koesveld and with wife Libby Lloyd. I am flattered to be a guest instructor on this trip. The dates for this breathtaking tour are 18 September – 2 October 2015. Learn more about it HERE.

So while you are trying to make up your mind what workshop is best for you take a moment and read, workshop participant, blogger, musician, film critic, photographer and Renaissance man Fernando Gros’ blog post How To Choose And Make The Most Of A Photographic Workshop.

 

Sometimes the view is so amazing you have to put the camera down and just soak it in.

Sometimes you just have to put the camera down and soak in view.

Continue reading