Depth of Field: Michael Freeman

Michael Freeman

Michael Freeman is one of the photographers I had wanted to interview for a long time. His book on composition, “The Photographer’s Eye” had become the first book I hand to new photographers. It is destined to become the classic treatise on composition – a must read for every photographer.

Michael is one of the most widely published photographers in the world. He has worked for most major international magazine and book publishers in a long career. A leading photographer for the Smithsonian Magazine for three decades (more than 40 assignment stories), He has also published more than 120 books on subjects as varied as Angkor, Sudan, ethnic minorities in Southeast Asia, the Shakers, and contemporary Japanese design and architecture. His 50 books on the practice of photography are standard works, and have sold almost two million copies in more than 20 languages. His contribution to teaching is the photography courses at the UK’s Open College of the Arts, now to degree level in the national curriculum. London-based, Michael Freeman travels for half of each year on shooting assignments, principally in Asia. His latest large-format reportage book is The Tea Horse Road, the result of a two-year exploration of one of the longest trade routes in the ancient world, between China and Tibet.

Visit his blog HERE.
His Open College of the Arts educational support website we talk about in the interview HERE.

You can listen to more Depth of Field podcasts HERE.

Dear Beginner, You make ripples!

Photographers can cause ripples.

Recently I had an email from a reader who had some basic photography questions. He was dealing with some pretty common issues that most beginners deal with. He has been frustrated that his images, though taken in some very exotic locations don’t seem to grab the viewer. After I looked over some of his images and made some strong suggestions, I got the email below. Continue reading