Disk Warrior 5 Saved A Year of Photos!

Last April, two days before I left to go back to the USA to be with my dying mother, I tried to reformat my main backup drive with my complete library of images on it. Honestly, I wasn’t trying to do this. A day before, I had another drive fail, and I thought I was reformatting that drive. But in my haste and with my mind already with my mother I selected the wrong drive. This drive had close to a year’s worth of photos that were a backup of the failed drive. But these photos were the only copy, they were the backup.

As soon as it started formatting, I knew I had made a mistake. But God smiled on me, and the reformatting failed for no apparent reason. But the drive volume’s disk directory was badly damaged. None of the data was accessible. I quickly opened TechTools Pro and I could see the drive was full. So I thought, maybe my data was intact.

I thought I had might have a chance to save my images, if I could just get to them! But TechTools Pro would not even mount. I felt sick. Almost a year of pictures probably lost. I quickly upgraded my TechTools Pro to version 9 (cha ching sound effect). I even talked with their tech support team. They told me there was no way to save it. TechTools Pro couldn’t even find any old files to rescue. Piet Van den Eynde suggested I try Disk Drill and at least try to rescue as many photos as I could. Remember, we are talking over a year’s worth of images mixed in with over 300 thousand images!

I bought Disk Drill (cha ching), it worked a little better. It found the disk and was able to recover around a thousand images before timing out or getting stuck. What was worse was, none of the recovered image were the ones I didn’t have backed up. So I was encouraged there were still images on the disk! But I wasn’t getting the right ones off.

I couldn’t think about this anymore. I needed to think about my mother. I put all this off till I returned in late March. After returning in March, I retried both TechTools Pro 9 and Disk Drill again. Disk Drill kept timing out or getting stuck. TechTools Pro wasn’t able to do much of anything. Apparently, the file structure was too badly mangled and nothing was going to work. I consulted more people I knew; everyone told me just format the drive and enjoy the “new” 6TB of storage. Part of me knew there must be a way.

I researched the net, and several folks said that Disk Warrior, by Alsoft had helped them in impossible situations. I used to own an older copy before a while back. Never felt it was any better than TechTools Pro. So why waste the money?

Time went by and I put the drive aside. I wouldn’t think about it again until I would find an image in Lightroom and see that the file was missing. I would get that sick feeling all over again.

Then yesterday I opened Disk Drill once again, and it wanted to do an update. I updated the software and… no luck. Same story. It stalled after a few minutes.

This got me thinking again. I decided to try Disk Warrior and give it one last try before I reformatted the whole drive. I found my old serial number and bought an $79 upgrade (cha ching). Alsoft sure didn’t make it simple. They won’t just let you buy it and download it. I had to wait 15 plus hours for them to mail me a USB drive with the software on it. Only after they mailed it would they email me a link. A link, that would then send me to yet another link that would in turn send me via email a 20 mg install file! Why not just let me download my software from their website? Go figure.

But this morning I got the download link and later the file arrived. I then installed it and started to run Disk Warrior 5 while I went for breakfast. After breakfast, I saw it was doing something. Things were churning, and progress bars were moving. Should I get my hopes up? No! I went to brush my teeth and when I came back it was done. It said it had successfully rebuilt my hard drive! WHAT!!!! YES! It had, and I quickly mounted the drive, and all my files were there!! Everything is where I left it and no errors. The whole drive is back to normal. Thank you Alsoft!

I can’t say enough about Disk Warrior. If you don’t have it GET IT NOW!! 5 Stars!!

Feb 2017 Varanasi Lighting Workshop

Here is a quick look at the recent Master Class in Lighting and Portraiture that Piet Van den Eynde and I led in Delhi and Varanasi, India, this past February.  I gotta say, the workshop went off close as planned, and that’s pretty good for a workshop ran in India. In India, anything can happen and usually does. There are always a few hiccups and bumps along the way in any field-based photographic workshop. In spite of that, I feel that I walked away with some really stellar shots and I saw some amazing photos by participants as well.

 

Varsha Dasgupta poses as the god Ganesh.

 

Era Dogra looks through the veil in this kathak pose.

We started the trip off with two days in Delhi. This gave us just enough time to visit some of our favorite haunts.  But the highlight of our Delhi time for me was the model shoot we worked out. A few years back while visiting Humayun’s Tomb in New Delhi, we met some very fun and quirky young ladies. They asked us to take their photos and of course “friend” them on Facebook. I soon came to know that one of the young ladies was a traditional kathak dancer. One thing led to another and soon we had a photo shoot of beautiful Indian dancers for our New Delhi portion of the workshop. What a great way to start the trip!

After our time in Delhi, we took the night train to the holy city of  Varanasi. Here we had previously arraigned photo opportunities as well as models for the group to photograph. To call a few of eccentric holy men models, might be a stretch. But we did work it out with several to be our photographic subjects aka model. Together, we photographed them on the river bank, in buildings, around temples and even on boats.

Below is a set of a few images from this trip. I hope you enjoy them.

 

 

Of course, we didn’t set everything up. You can tell from the selection of photos above, we did a lot of walking around flower markets, fish markets and even visited a traditional Indian wrestling club where everything was spontaneous. We were lucky, this time at the wrestling club, they didn’t have Piet and I strip down to our skivvies like the last time we visited.

When is the next workshop?

 

 

Overall it was an amazing time and one that stretched all of us to try new things and come up with new and exciting images. If you want to join us for the next workshop, we will be offering it this coming Nov 26th through Dec 3rd. But this time we will be replacing Delhi with Kolkata! What an amazing city. Did you know that Kolkata is the last remaining place on the planet where you can still find and photograph hand-pulled rickshaws? It’s true! If you are interested in joining us, be sure to sign up so you know when registration for the workshop goes live. Last time the workshop sold out in an hour. You don’t want to just check your blog feed and hope you time it right. We will be letting subscribers to our newsletter know in advance the day and time when registration will go live. This past workshop I asked participants who they got in on the registration so quick. almsot every one of them said they set their alarms. As such I will give you a hint, we move the timing so folks from the U.S. all they way to Asia will not have to wake up in the middle of the night. But you will need to sign up now so we can let you know the timing. You know what they say, “Timing is everything!”

Don’t miss the next Master Class because you were sleeping. Want to know in advance when registration will go live? Then, remember to sign up for my newsletter if you want to be notified first. 

ADHD and How I cope with it.

I was diagnosed with dyslexia back somewhere close to 1974. In those days many phycologists and other said the same thing about dyslexia that people are saying today about ADHD, “It’s just an “American disease” or “only problem with that kid is the way he was raised.” Now, of course, we know this isn’t the case at all. We have fMRIs that show there is something different going on in the brain of someone with either dyslexia or ADD.

Photographers who are ADD, ADHD or dyslexics are faced with unique challenges that other creatives and business people don’t face. In this video, I look at ways to cope with these differences.

If you are ADD or dyslexia, I would love to hear how you have learned to cope and excel in a world that isn’t attuned to they way you function.

I mention that I would link my packing Pro list so folks can download it. You will find it linked below. I hope it helps. Just use it as a starting point and tailor it to your need.


I am not sure I will have a video next week as I am leading a workshop inIndia with my good friend and workshop partner Piet Van den Eynde. But check back soon for a report of the week’s events.

Matt Brandon Vlog 12: Fujifilm GFX Review and more.

Currently, I am in Laos, once again. If you recall, I was in Laos back in late November shooting my first ever video for a client. I shot the whole video on the X-T2. I was amazed at the quality. The learning curve to use the X-T2 for shooting basic video was surprisingly short. Not that I know everything, not at all. It just seems more intuitive than when I had my Canon 5D MKIII. But, this post is not about the X-T2. It is, however about the video posted above, the Fujifilm GFX medium format camera first look.

Piet Van den Eynde had a chance to use the Fuji GFX in the field in India. In this video, I speak with Piet about his thoughts and impressions of this new ground breaking camera.

I am not going to reiterate all the information in the video. You can watch it. I will, however, give you the links to the products and the video we shot.

You can visit Piet’s blog to see the GFX’s specs on paper, so to speak. Even more exciting he shows you the actual images this beast can make: Visit his blog HERE.

GFX Challenges Video

Product Links:

GFX Medium Format Camera

GF110mmF2 R LM WR

GF63mmF2.8 R WR

GF32-64mmF4 R LM WR

f-Stop Loka UL

SMDV SpeedBox Review

SMDV BRiHT-360 Compact Monolight

WD My Passport Pro 3TB
WD My Passport Pro 2TB

Lastolite Non-Rotating Extending Handle

3 Legged Thing Albert Tripod

Sirui P-324S Carbon Photo/Video Monopod

Want to hear about upcoming workshops even before they are announced on the blog? Then, remember to sign up for my newsletter if you want to be notified first. 

The Coal Haulers of Varanasi, India & the Fuji GFX

The face of a coal hauler from Bihar, India. (Click to view larger)

(Note: All these photos are taken with the Fujifilm X-T2, NOT the GFX.)

Late last month, Piet Van Den Eynde asked if I could help him produce a video. Piet was one of 20 photographers in the world who was invited to use the new, as yet unreleased, Fujifilm GFX medium format camera in their workflow. Piet, Serge Van Cauwenbergh, Alou and I snuck off to India to film him using this amazing camera in the wilds of India. As you will see, Piet certainly put the GFX through its paces, using it in places and on occasions where you would never think of bringing a medium format camera. It was all hush, hush till today. As you can see, Fujifilm has released our video to the world, so now we can talk about it. In fact, we will be doing a lot of talking about it in the weeks to come.

We needed some very special images for this video, and I believe we got them. One of the most interesting places we visited was this train yard. Piet made some amazing images, which you will see in the video and later on his blog. Our time there was very short, yet the scene we uncovered really deserved more than just a few images for the video. So I moved quickly to capture these images. I hope you can get a feel of the intensity of the work these men do on a daily basis.

Varanasi, like most cities in India, runs on both electricity and coal. The coal arrives from the mines by freight trains. Car after car of coal arrives in a half mile long train filled with raw coal. Each car needs to be unloaded and then loaded back into lorries for delivery. The problem is this process of transferring a ton or more of coal from a train car to a lorry is all done by hand, literally. Five to six men are assigned to each train car. It takes an average of 8 to 10 hours for the men to remove all the coal from the car. It is dumped next to the car ready to be reloaded into the lorry the next day by the same men. Then the whole process starts over again. The men wear flip flops or even go barefooted throughout the day. The coal dust is everywhere, including their lungs. Each man makes an average of 300 Rupees or $5 USD a day. I asked them if any of them get sick or have a cough. None of them seemed to want to answer me. I think they were suspicious. Frankly, they need the work. Most of them were from the next state over, Bihar. All their earnings go home to their family. A family that they may never get to see again.

After visiting these men and photographing them, we felt that our workshops need to me more than about taking amazing photos. We need to get involved with the places we photograph. As such, Piet and I are researching organizations that we might donate a percentage of our profit. We are in search of organizations that help people like these men and others we photograph to rise above their circumstances to a better life. If you know of an organization like this let us know.

Note: If you want to join Piet and me on our next workshop to Varanasi, India in late 2017, be sure to sign up for our newsletter to be notified when the registration goes live. We announce open registration first to our newsletter subscribers. This is one of the perks of subscribing to the newsletter. Then only after 24 hours will we make registration public. The last workshop sold out in 1 hour.  When you subscribe, be sure to check your email for confirmation.

Subscribe here:

   


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A laborer has to break up the larger pieces of coal so they can be loaded by hand into the lorries.

 

 

 

 

After unloading the coal from the train, they workers have to clear it from under the car it arrived in. No coal can be wasted.

 

Roll after roll of lorries wait to be loaded up with coal for delivery into the city.

 

This and the photo below are of drivers waiting for the coal to be loaded into their lorries.

 

 

 

Facing Your Flash Phobia

off-camera flash, Jinbie HB600, Expose for the background

Here is Nayoung being a temporary model so I can adjust the background exposure and the power of the flash.

If you have spent any amount of time on my blog, you know that I have a phobia about off-camera lighting. I love to use on-camera flash and play with dragging the shutter. But off-camera – that’s the kind of stuff that makes my palms sweat and my body break out in hives. I am not sure why it is so befuddling for me. Maybe it has to do with my many learning disabilities or the fact that I waited way too long to learn this trick and now I am an old dog. Whatever the reason, it has been a journey of two steps forward, one step back.

background exposure, test shot, Jinbie HD 600

This is photo is pretty much right out of the camera. This was pretty close to what I wanted for my background exposure.

My off-camera flash mentor is Piet Van den Eynde, my Miyagi of light. You may recall, Piet sold me his Jinbei HD600 strobe. It is a 600-watt monster that competes with the big boys like ProFoto’s B1, only at about a third or less of the cost. It is the Jinbei that I have been using to confront my fears. Why the Jinbei and not a speed light? Well, for one thing, it is entirely manual and believe it or not, shooting manually with a flash is proving easier for me and is giving me a great foundation. Once you learn the fundamentals, only then can one move on. Wax on, wax off. Another reason I chose the Jinbei is because it is so powerful; it can overpower the sun and allow me to use this flash anytime and anywhere.

Whenshooting in manual it really is just a mater of taking a shot and making the adjustments. Here the flash needed more power.

When shooting in manual it is just a matter of making an exposure then adjusting it. In this exposure, the flash needed a lot more power.

For the past few weeks, I have been getting to know a couple of new photographers in my town, Simon Bond, and Pete DeMarco (another Pete). Simon and Pete are both relatively new to the area; they arrived here while I was away in the U.S. over the past year. These guys shoot a very different style than I shoot.. They are more into creative techniques and photo magic such as  light painting.

Simon and Pete invited me to try out light painting.  Simon has a new toy he is still learning to use. They wanted to introduce me to light stick called a Pixelstick.  They suggested we go to the very southern tip of the island to a place called Vanilla Bay and shoot against the sunset. The only real issue is there has not been a significant sunset for many days. It has rained every day here since arriving back to Malaysia in September. But the weather changes here by the minute, so who know? We risked it and drove to Vanilla Bay.

We were a rather large group: Pete and his partner Nayoung, Simon and his wife Jayoung, Vijiakumar Shunmugam from a local Facebook photo group,and Chrysmic Qmin and her boyfriend Yaan Sin Lee. Qmin acted as our model.

Pete, Simon and their respective partners and I arrived early to scout the right location and set up the gear. Sometimes the best moments are serendipitous. As we arrived I noticed two boys flying red balloons from fishing poles. The boys were silhouetted against a late afternoon sky.his was too good to pass up.

I quickly asked Nayoung to stand in as my model while I frantically tried to get the exposure of the sky correct. What I have learned, (wax on) is to first expose your scene for the background. Get it as dark or as light as you want it. Of course, all this is done in manual mode. On my X-Pro2 I needed a flash sync of 1/250 sec. so I simply adjusted the aperture to get the desired exposure.

A side note here: the biggest enemy in my photography and I would wager in yours is panic. I was quickly trying to get the exposure before these boys left or their balloons popped. I kept telling myself, “Slow down!”

 

Jinbei HD 600, Vanilla Bay Balancing ambient light and flash.

Eventually, it all comes together!

 

Jinbei HD 600, Vanilla Bay Balancing ambient light and flash.

Serendipity!

 

It's a good feeling to get it right in the camera.

It’s a good feeling to get it right in the camera.

Once I got the background exposed the way I wanted it I had to set up the flash unit and softbox. “It is still pretty bright out, do I use the grid or not?” Trial and error. I left it off for the time being.  I told myself, “Just set it up and take a few frames to balance the exposure on Nayong (wax off).” It was way too light. I needed to lower the power of this monster. Bam! I got it!

Above are the results of my effort. But it was only after a few frames, and the boys left. Of course not without a portrait of their own.

 

Chrysmic Qmin

Chrysmic Qmin

 

Chrysmic Qmin and her boyfriend. An impromptu couple shot between setups.

Chrysmic Qmin and her boyfriend. They asked for an impromptu couple shot between setups.

 

Later that night I became the VALS or Voice Activated Light Stand ;-).  In other words, I held the light all night. But it gave me a chance to observe Simon and his Pixelstick in action. I began watching how he maneuvered it. I had to try. I had an idea. Could I make angel wings? If I turned on the stick while standing behind her and moving the stick to form a wing then turning it off and repeating the same move on the other side it should make wings. In theory. The problem is, I can’t stand behind her when the flash is popped. So I have to run out and after the flash goes off start drawing my wings. Easier said than done on coral rock at night with a 5 foot Pixelstick  in your hand.

 

My first attempt at angel wings looked more like a peacock tail!

My first attempt at angel wings looked more like a peacock tail!

 

After thinking it through , this was a much better attempt. Not bad for two tries.

After thinking it through , this was a much better attempt. Not bad for two tries.

 

On my first try I just about broke my ankle (actually cut it on the coral) Oh well, the show must go on. The second try was better. Maybe the blood loss slowed me down. By this time of night, everyone was exhausted and frankly, it was time to go home.

 

 

A good night of inspiration and hard work using new tech. It was also a night of relearning old lessons: don’t panic, slow down, be purposeful.

Tomorrow I am off to some pretty fun places with my piece of tech, my Fujifilm X-T2. Be looking for new photos and some thoughts on this amazing little camera in the days to come.

Announcing the 2nd Location Portraiture & Lighting Masterclass in Varanasi, India

banner Masterclass

 

I am pleased to announce the second Location Portraiture and Lighting Masterclass in Varanasi, India. Well, ok it’s really the second time we’ve run the class, but the first time we’ve used this name. I am teaming up again with Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Guru and Wizard of Light Piet Van den Eynde. We will be releasing full details in the days to come. But let me assure you this will be an amazing class! Piet and I have been working all winter hammering out the details to make this class one that will be both highly educational, exciting, challenging and memorable and I think we have succeeded. We will be covering techniques and skills that are often skipped over on other workshops of this price or length. We will be covering the broad topics of: Continue reading

Podcast: A look at the Fujifilm X-Pro2 and more…

Piet, (foreground) and Rene with the camera and the SMDV Speedbox Professional 70cm and a Cactus RF60 in the alleyway of Varanasi, India.

Piet, (foreground) and Rene (camera to his face) and the SMDV Speedbox Professional 70cm and a Cactus RF60 in the alleyway of Varanasi, India.

Every year after our workshop in India, Piet Van den Eynde and I spend an hour or so talking about this years new Fujifilm gear. Because we do it in the field it sometimes becomes difficult to find a good location to record these discussions. It is India after all, things are noisy. One year we even made a tent out of blankets and recorded the show under it. Not to worry, this years was a breeze. Piet and I only had to deal with noisy bellhops and stray dogs,  all of this served as a background to an amazing hour of looking at the latest gear from Fujifilm.  For this episode we invited camera geek and photographer Rene Debar, host of the Fuji Xtras blog to help us with our yearly overview and to discuss the new Fujifilm X-Pro2. Continue reading